2-5-1’s Part 4

The 2-5-1, possibly the most common harmonic device in all of jazz harmony. In this course we deconstruct and demystify the process of increasing your ability to improvise over it!

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2-5-1’s Part 1

The 2-5-1, possibly the most common harmonic device in all of jazz harmony. I this course we deconstruct and demystify the process of increasing your ability to improvise over it!

This content is for members only.

Lessons from the road – Miami – Chord Inversions part 1

The conditions here in Miami couldn’t be more drastically different in terms of humidity from the desert last week! And in response to a question in the comments section below a chord inversion lesson this lesson, and the next one I’ll post are all about chord inversions with the 7th in the root. Lots of great material to be had from this simple concept!

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Vocabulary – Holdsworth Diminished Sound

I was listening to some Alan Holdsworth recently, I think it might have been the song Tokyo Dream, but it was definitely something around that era. I got hooked on some diminished sounds that Alan was using, and decided it was time to stop putting off learning about because it’s technically difficult, and find a solution to the problem! so here it is, a look inside my process for not only transcribing a specific piece of music, but also for tackling things that I can’t execute right away.

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Chord Changes and Linear Ideas #2 – Part 1

This lesson looks at a Flat 6, Flat 7 to One cadence in the key of Bb, and I take a look at some ideas to help you be prepared for when you come across this pretty common cadence in your playing. From just understanding the various harmonic aspects of the sequence, to what melodic language you can use as a starting point for your improvisation.

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Minor Chord Inversions

Simple inversions of minor chords can be so effective, and I’ve recently started working on creating chord sequences and arpeggiated lines by employing some simple harmonic techniques. In this lesson I take a minor chord in it’s three positions (root, 1st, and 2nd) and also a major chord which is the 5 of the key also in it’s three inversions.

You’ll notice my dyslexia kicking in in several places in this video. I was going to shoot the whole thing over again, but the actually playing and content was captured really well I thought so I recommend listening to the music and notes way more than my talking! It’s nothing major in terms of verbal mistakes, but there are a few places where I give the wrong names for a couple of chords. But the basis of all of these lessons is listening! and the more you can listen to these shapes and sounds and pick them up by ear the better!

Check out part two of this video when it’s released to see how I incorporate these ideas into my practice routine, and then develop them into compositions.

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Playing Over A Vamp

I’m guessing I’m not the only one who comes across a situation where the harmony isn’t moving that much, so here is a lesson on how to make that harmony interesting, give yourself way more options to create melodies, and make it sound like there is actually more going on harmonically than there actually is…

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